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20121206
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
you see israel at this moment after gaza, after the palestinian vote at the united nations? >> well, i think that the gaza operation was necessary. they -- the operation started with the killing of one of the murderers and terrorists. there was responsible for the almost endless attacks against israelis, innocent citizens inside of t state of israel. >> rose: but at the same time, hadn't he been doing some negotiations and dealings in terms of trying to promote certain ideas? >> after he's there, there were all kinds of rumors about it, but during the times i was prime minister there were always kinds of ideas that were raised by third parties that we may negotiate indirectly with him but he was dedicated to one thing, to the destruction of the state of israel and therefore this outcome was inevitable. >> rose: but speaking of that, is it now understood that there will not be targeted assassinations in gaza? >> well, israel always said if there there will not be an attempt to launch rockets against israeli civilians then there will not be such activities then israel will not have a rea
the united nations vote whether to recognize the palestinian state. recognizing a palestinian state but the united states, israel and others are not celebrating. we will get the details ahead. the senate is working to change the law. the law that lets cops and the feds read our e-mails. they can just read them if the messages are more than six months old. a change coming that could affect all privacy. i am still on air today because my staff didn't win the record $588 million powerball jackpot. the deal was, if they won, obviously they were thought coming to work and the stage manager was going to anchor and i was going to hang out on their boat. but, no, there are two winners, obviously we hate them. we will talk about them unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." >> first from fox at 3:00, the united nations general assembly hold a historic vote any moment on recognizing an independent palestinian state. it is expected to pass overwhelmingly despite opposition from the united states and israel which are in a vast majority of the u.n.'s 193 members. this measure
made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 243. the nays are 170. the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from connecticut seek recognition? >> thank you, mr. speaker. by the direction of the democratic caucus, i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 822, resolved, that the following named members be and are hereby elected to the following standing committees of the house of representatives -- one, committee on agriculture, mr. garamendi. two, committee on science, space and technology, mr. curson. mr. larson: i ask that the resoluti
at the united nations first to james rosen at the state department and to james nato is taking steps to minimize the amount landing outside of syria. >> that's right, shep. the foreign ministers of the military alliance gathered in brussels today and announced there that they have approved a request made by member state turkey which asked for u.s.-made patriot antimissile batteries to be installed along its southern border syria. the ministry made clear the systems are purely defensive. germany and netherlands are supplying the pac three model as soon as their respective parliaments approve the deal which is expected to come soon. >> when that exactly will happen will depend on a number of practical issues that will be sorted out in the very near future. so i can't give you an exact date but i will tell you that the actual deployment of missiles will take place within weeks. >> hundreds of nato troops will also be deployed to install and operate these antimissile weapons but it doesn't appear right now that they will be u.s. troops, shep. >> shepard: sheriffs clinton was at that meeting in bruss
united nations to take control of the internet? jon: just in. new information out of egypt. reuters is reporting that egyptian president mohammed morsi has left the presidential palace after protesters fight with riot police outside the palace. of course he has been under intense pressure from his own people ever since he assumed autocratic powers and he has been engaged in a fight with the court system there. people have been very angry about what he has done. at any rate according to reuters he has left the presidential palace because of this, well, call them, demonstration, call them a mob. i'm not sure how you want to describe it but those are pictures outside the presidential palace in cairo. night has fallen there. we'll keep an eye on the situation. we have our steve harrigan there. we'll let you know as soon as we learn more. jenna: disturbing new signs al qaeda is on the rebound in parts of the middle east and after frica. the latest a large-scale al qaeda plot in jordan. they plan to hit deadly terror attacks in the capital and hit the u.s. embassy during the chaos. behind
. >>> the other big story we're watching for you, a second round of sitdowns for united nations ambassador susan rice, who's in an all-out campaign of her own to face her critics. after three republicans issued blistering comments yesterday, this morning rice is meeting with republican senator susan collins of maine and in an hour is expected to meet with senator bob corker of tennessee. rice's harshest krit eks are still vowing to block her potential nomination as next secretary of state. >> i think everybody gets to, one, be nominated, and, two, go through the hearings and the debate and discussion. but right now i would be very hard-press hard-pressed. >> what they're suging is that she said things for political reasons three weeks before the election. >> what's the long game, willy? what are they doing? this doesn't help the republican party. >> that is the big question. what is the long game? let's dig down. we have our wednesday political power panel, msnbc contributor joanne reed, managing editor for the gree owe, msnbc contributor arty melbourne, also a cords for the nation, and republic
. >> thanks for starting our morning like that, victor. >> it's a big day at the united nations. as well a big day for palestinians. they are asking members of the general assembly to approve a resolution to upgrade their status from permanent observer to nonmember state. a vote is scheduled for this afternoon and is expected to pass. >> keep in mind the united states and israel are both opposed to the resolution. let's go to cnn foreign affairs reporter live in washington. good morning. >> good morning, brooke. israel very opposed to the move. the u.s. knows this move went give the palestinians what they want -- a state. this is largely symbolic. will have no effect on sovereignty or borders. hillary clinton met with president abbas and tried to assure him not to go ahead with the move. let's listen to what she told reporters yesterday. sfm know matter what happens it will not change what i support. the only way to get a lasting solution is to commence direct negotiations and we need an environment conducive to that. we have urged both parties to refrain from actions that might in any way mak
the united nations is making a move to recognize the palestinians. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announc
to a kr credible location. >> and the obama administration is saying what the united nations did unilaterally was a setback. do you agree with that? the body i represent is split. some people are in favor of the u.s. vote. the truth of it, the only thing that will work to deliver a palestinian state side-by-side with a secure state of israel is peace. as you can see we have a chance now. the president has been re-elected. i know he's deeply personally committed to this and we just have to regrip it, i'm afraid. >> what's gone wrong? >> it's partly because there's so much turmoil in the region right now. it's how each side views its own prospects. >> how would you characterize a credible negotiation given the fact as long as we've been alive there's been these problems that keep erupting and never, ever get solved? we've been trying for 20, 30 years. it was 50, 60 years before we got one that worked. and actually back in the year 2000, and again in 2008, you have no option in the end. the only thing that works is to make it credible if we shape the negotiations. give it some shape
a former chief justice of the connecticut supreme court, a former united states attorney, several partners at major connecticut and national law firms, an academic, business leaders and community leaders throughout the state. their insights and hard work throughout the process were really invaluable to my colleague from connecticut and i, and i express on this floor my gratitude to them for their service. based on the work of the advisory panel and our review of its recommendations, senator blumenthal and i recommended michael shea to the president for nomination. i will say that michael was ranked very high among the applicants, highly qualified applicants for this position by all members of the advisory panel, and i should say here right at the outset that we are grateful to president obama for nominating him for this place on our court. michael shea is a native of west hartford, connecticut, a graduate of amherst college and yale law school, served as a clerk to judge james buckley, though a resident of connecticut, sat on the u.s. court of appeals for the district of columbia. michael
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, romney, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how romney would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate romney was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what romney didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goalie. they just shot goals on him for four years and some of them went through and some of them didn't a
is routine for us. people want the united states to climb out of this whole and fix this problem. the clock is ticking. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] what next, the former court shares of the former the opposite commission -- that is a commission -- deficit commission. and upcoming health policy debates in congress. washington journal begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern with headlines, calls, e-mails and tweets. >> washington worked his way up, went to harvard law school that emigrated west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its heyday. he arrived after about a month journey by ship and stagecoach in train and arrived in a muddy mining town, established in law practice in a log cabin. then slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer. then got involved politically, ran for congress eight terms. then the french did abraham lincoln -- then befriended abraham lincoln and ulysses s. grant. as they are on the rise, washburn stayed with them as a close confidant during the civil war.
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)